It is currently Sat Dec 15, 2018 3:35 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: welder?
PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2007 11:32 pm 
Offline
Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Apr 03, 2006 1:10 pm
Posts: 1626
Location: Beavercreek, OH (Dayton)
OK, I'm looking at doing some welding for my rig, like building better armor and also fabing a new smoker. I've been told I should get a wire feed welder rather than use my dad's stick arc welder. Any of you guys familiar with the Lincoln Weld Pak 100, which has an option to go MIG?

_________________
+
My opinions & advice are taken at your own risk.
+
2002 Patriot Blue KJ - Coming soon!
2006 Black LJ (Wrangler Unlimited), auto, custom skids, 3.5" Rubicon Express, Aussie D30, Rocker Guards & Cooper AT3 235x85r16
2009 Patriot Blue D2500, 5.7L Hemi, 4x4, Quad Cab
1967 Alberg 37' Masthead rigged Sloop


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 13, 2007 12:48 am 
Offline
LOST Junkie
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 16, 2006 10:08 pm
Posts: 633
Location: Franklin Ohio U.S.A.
Hey Moose,I have heard a little bit about this Lincoln Weld Pack,and I think for light welding it's probably not too bad.But......And you probably new there was going to be a But....I think it's a gasless welder at about 90 amps.I'm also thinking it will only weld steel up to 1/8" or so.I use an Argon gas type MAC TOOLS welder at the auto shop I work at and I think for just a little more money it works alot better.Don't get me wrong,lincoln makes some of the best welding equipment I,ve seen but this model seems to be very entry level.We weld up alot of exhaust systems with our welder,but if we need to we can also weld up to 1/4 plate with it.I think that a gas type welder will give you better penetration and will be alot more user friendly.I'm not a certified welder but I've been Mig and Tig welding for quite some time.You probably live close enough you could always PM me and come down some time and tinker with our welder.Again I dont mean to knock another product but I think a little research is always welcome.Hope this helps! :)

_________________
Ron
03 Red Libberty Sport
3.7 V6 Auto 4x4
Lifted
Cooper Discover ATRs 265/75/16
American Racing 16x8 Polished Baja Wheels
Moog Lower Ball Joints
Member#051397 L.O.S.T. Midwest


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 13, 2007 1:37 am 
Offline
LOST Newbie
User avatar

Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2006 1:37 pm
Posts: 17
Location: Phoenix, Az
The weld-pak 100 will do 1/4" stock with flux core wire. I have had mine for the last 5 years and have had no problem with it. It is more for home use than commercial.
Image

_________________
2007 Sport 4x4 Stone White
2005 Grand Cherokee
1991 YJ


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 13, 2007 12:02 pm 
Offline
LOST Junkie
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 16, 2006 10:08 pm
Posts: 633
Location: Franklin Ohio U.S.A.
JimJ wrote:
The weld-pak 100 will do 1/4" stock with flux core wire. I have had mine for the last 5 years and have had no problem with it. It is more for home use than commercial.
Image
Hi JimJ I would agree that this welder might be all he needs,I just think that a MIG(metal inert gas)type does a better job.With that same welder I would either add a MIG conversion kit or just buy a gas type to start with.I think that with this welder you can attach any thickness of metals together but with less than 125 amps it's only going to penetrate about 1/8" or so.Again,not meaning to disagree with your experences in any way but this info I found may be usefull.
Ron :)

The acronym MIG stands for Metal Inert Gas welding. It is also referred to as GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding).

MIG welders are usually referred to as wire-feed welders. The word "Metal" in the process name refers to the consumable wire electrode used in the process. The wire and the weld joint are shielded by an inert gas and the wire electrode which is continuously fed into the arc and weld joint acts as the filler rod. MIG is most typically used to best effect in commercial fabrication settings where continuous welding is desired, and where environmental conditions, joint preparation, and materials can be controlled.

Unlike TIG and stick welding, weld quality results are affected by more machine controlled variables: the current generating capacity of the welder, the thickness of the material to be welded, the thickness of the wire electrode, speed of travel, type of shielding gas used, flow rate of shielding gas, and (of course) the preparation of the joint (i.e., clean, properly beveled, etc.).

About 1 amp of welding current is required for each .001" of material thickness. For example, assuming welding 1/8" plate in a single "pass" requires approximately 125A of welding current. Thicker material requires even more power. A powerful professional grade MIG welder can make beautiful welds of very high quality. However, many of the low cost, low power units sold for consumer use can produce less than acceptable results. Common problems with MIG welds, derives from the fact that many of the low cost MIG units which are sold simply do not have enough power to make proper welds on thicker stock. Usually, poor penetration and or internal cracking (invisible cracks which form under the surface of the bead) are seen.

MIG welders with flux cored wire are also popular in applications where gas shielding can not be accomplished (outside, drafty, or windy conditions), and where a somewhat lower quality weld joint may be acceptable.

_________________
Ron
03 Red Libberty Sport
3.7 V6 Auto 4x4
Lifted
Cooper Discover ATRs 265/75/16
American Racing 16x8 Polished Baja Wheels
Moog Lower Ball Joints
Member#051397 L.O.S.T. Midwest


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 13, 2007 12:48 pm 
Offline
LOST Member

Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2006 7:24 pm
Posts: 280
Location: AridZona
I've got an SP-100T Lincoln and it has paid for itself a couple of times by just doing exhaust work welding up flages and mufflers.
Welders are a serious conundrum. You really want the best, and TIG is it, but the money will just keep rolling out of your pockets when you start comparing features and abilites. Gotta pay to play in the welding world.
I picked this welder because it came with a regulator so that I could just get a bottle and start mig welding. Since I was a home beer brewer and used CO2 for kegging, it was just a matter of using my keg gas bottles on the welder. I have only used CO2 for sheilding gas, but have had excellent results. My only complaint is that it is not realistic to weld aluminium. You need a spool gun becuase these little welders will not reliably push the softer wire through, and that will transmitt as a blotchy weld and create heat differances that will just screw up aluminium welds.
Also, I have welded 1/4 inch steel with very good results with flux core wire, no gas, since these can be hotter depending on the wire bought. But, the duty cycle is not very great, so I found that after a couple of 4 inch bead passes, the welder had to take a break for awhile. But, that is not very common welding at all. For most auto fab work, this little welder is awesome. Especially since it was under 300 bucks. Remember to select the voltage that you have readily available in your work environment. I have found it much easier to find a 110 source over a 230 at various places. Having a welder is like a pick-up truck, when people find out, they are your friend when "its moving day".

There are web outlets that will sell refurbished welders that still carry the factory warranty (mine was 3 years, but I've had it for 6 now without any problems). I do recommend you go with Lincoln, Miller (Hobart) or that swedish brand that I just can't think of the name. They are all quality manufactures, and their consumables(tips, liners, etc.) are readily available.

Oh yeah, a good auto darkening helmet helps out alot when you are welding under a vehicle.

Good luck.

_________________
2006 CRD Sport


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2007 1:33 pm 
Offline
LOST Member
User avatar

Joined: Fri Sep 23, 2005 5:33 pm
Posts: 326
Location: Ga
I got a mig for my birthday on ebay $100 was the final price and $49 to ship so say $150 its 110v and was not gas,845 for .35 flux wire and the bad part $99 for an auto darking helment. three spools later we ended up with this
Image
Image
it was 3/16 and it came out ok one spool of wire was practising to get the weld right bur now I can have fun with the welder ,it handels 1/8.3/16. and will do 1/4 but it takes its time and does reset about evert foot of weld

_________________
2002 liberty, Daystar 2.5 Lift, 265/75/16
2005 Unlimited, , 9.5 , BB , 33x12.5 15 , 7" fender flares
2000 S10 PU
Image Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2007 1:56 pm 
Offline
LOST Newbie
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 29, 2006 7:53 pm
Posts: 87
Location: Chandler, AZ
Moose, I'm gonna offer some different advice and say to just use your dad's arc welder. You could then use the savings for a nice hood, Leathers, or materials for some of the projects you want to do. That's what I'd do, but sometimes I'm kind of a cheap booty. :roll:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2007 4:12 pm 
Offline
LOST Member
User avatar

Joined: Sun Nov 12, 2006 7:38 pm
Posts: 137
Location: Kingston, Ontario, Canada
If you are going to get a welder, you should consider a MIG system, since your dad already has a stick wleder. Lincoln, Hobart, Miller are all fairly good, they all make nice 110v and 230v MIG rigs. I have a Lincoln MIG-PAK 10 and it's great for light fabrication work. I can do 1/4" but with multiple passes. I would say that 1/8 - 3/16" is about as thick as you'd want to do single-pass. Anything bigger, you're better off with the buzz-box.

Cheers,
Duey

p.s. my first project was to make a cart for my welder.

Image

_________________
2K9 Space Grey 335d Sport
2K1 Galaxy Blue Jetta TDI 5-sp


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: welder?
PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2018 4:28 am 
Offline
LOST Newbie
User avatar

Joined: Wed Dec 05, 2018 4:09 am
Posts: 1
Location: Toronto
I understand that I was a little late for the party, but I have some interesting observations that I want to share.

Despite already owning a Hobart 210 https://mechanicguides.com/best-cheap-welders-money/, I decided to add the Hobart 140 to the mix at home for a couple reasons. In one of my work areas, I lack the power necessary to run the 210 so a 115v version (the 140) makes sense … for minor applications. The 140 allows me the ability to tack weld some of my parts together good enough to move these sub-assemblies to my other work area containing my Hobart 210 for final welding. With all this in mind, here is my review of the item:

Packaging: Well packaged. It was shipped thru Amazon in just its own Hobart packaging. No additional packaging (aka Amazon box) was present. Shocked a bit by this but ok, it made it here just fine never the less.

Assembly: Takes just a couple minutes to assemble the regulator to the welder (adjustable wrench or correctly fit open end wrench required) & mig torch to the welder (no tools required). I opted to setup for gas welding and purchased a spool of .030 welding wire & adjusted the lead connections inside the welder to reflect that I am welding with shielding gas & not flux core. Removed the 20# spool adapter, installed the wire spool, inserted the wire in the gun & adjusted the wire tension. Last step was to install a .030 tip on the gun & go.

Operation: Adjustment is easily done on the front of the unit. I did notice that this unit is quite a bit louder than my Hobart 210 but it was quiet enough to not be a bothersome factor while welding. I like the chart on the inside cover of the welder as a reminder of wire gauge, speed, power, etc. based on material. It serves as a good guideline by which to get started. A little adjustment of the 75/25 gas mixture & I was off an welding.

Ad-On: The selection of available wire types & sizes for various materials compliments the unit nicely. The small size & portability (as well as 115v operation) were key factory for a lite-duty unit. I opted to buy a small 75/25 tank and Hobart small cart. Next purchase with be a cover.

Key Notes: A few things to watch when operating the unit. Keeping it cool. Make sure it is in an area with good air flow. Keeping the unit cool can extend your duty-cycle and possibly the life of the unit. Watch your maximum extension cord length. If you do choose to use an extension cord, be sure to go with the heaviest gauge you can. This will help get the necessary amperage to the unit & extend duty-cycle. Last is … duty-cycle. The higher amperage you weld with, the shorter your duty cycle will be. Example: 20% duty cycle (cycle rates are in the manual and found online for “power” vs. “run time”) means that in normal conditions at a given power output of the welder, you can weld for 2 minutes and allow the welder to rest for 8 minutes. The lower power output of the welder (thinner metals), the higher the duty-cycle will be (longer weld time & shorter rest time).

In the end want attach helpfull video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rtGF5n-NTk0


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group. Color scheme by ColorizeIt!
Logo by pixeldecals.com