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 Post subject: FAQ's on the CRD
PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2006 6:25 pm 
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Back again as a sticky, with orginal rules. Sent me PM for something you want to have posted as a FAQ and I will post it for you. This is to keep it from straying off topic and having unnecessary postings.

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Last edited by oldnavy on Thu Dec 21, 2006 12:00 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject: What is a Fumoto Oil Drain Valve?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2006 7:13 pm 
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It is a valve that has a spring loaded valve that allows for easy release of the oil without taking out a drain plug.

The cure for CRD oil drain plug problems often had here is a FUMOTO Oil Drain with a special adaptor that can only be optained from Greg at Lubrication Specialist

This makes fishing for oil drain plug, stripped threads or bolts not torqued tight enough and coming loose a thing of the past. It also allows for easy oil sampling at any time with out draining the oil or having a major oil loss and mess.

There is a Fumoto available from Greg that will fit our transfer case that has a nipple allowing for easy change of transfer case fluid without dropping the skid plate.

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Last edited by oldnavy on Thu Dec 21, 2006 12:19 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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 Post subject: Will loose fuel cap cause a CEL?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2006 8:08 pm 
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No.

Why? Because diesels do not have a system to recover fumes from the fuel tank like gassers and for that reason not monitored by the vehicle electronics.


The reason for this is diesel fuel does not expand any measurable amount like gasoline.

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 Post subject: How important is where I buy Fuel?
PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 10:00 pm 
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Very important.

The turn over time is important because diesel fuel will grow micro organisms when not properly treated for long term storage.

Also some of the "local" service stations that do oil changes often dump the used oil into the diesel tanks.

If possible buy at truck centers or some large gas station the sell a lot of diesel.

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 Post subject: Why does my air filter get dirty fast and wet when it rains?
PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2006 9:45 pm 
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The CRD has a poorly designed air box allowing for easy entry of water and road debries. This causes filter to become dirty and needing replacing early and when driven in the rain can cause low fuel economy and power loss, and can possibly cause check engine lights or lead to engine shut down. This can be easly prevented by installing the the lower half of the '02 air box from a 3.7L gasser Liberty, along with the snorkel, and deflector. The lid from the CRD airbox is retained and reused.

Deflector: Part #53013509AA, QTY: 1.00 @ $8.52 = $8.52
Snorkel: Part #53013103AA, QTY: 1.00 @ $9.54 = $9.54
Airbox: Part #53013108AA, QTY: 1.00 @ $70.56 = $70.56


Subtotal: $88.62
Shipping: $12.50
Taxes: $0.00

The total amount to be charged is $101.12

All parts listed were ordered by a member from Jeff MOPAR Super Center but can be bought at any Jeep dealer, however they may cost more.

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Last edited by oldnavy on Thu Jun 21, 2007 11:29 am, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject: Should I use a K&N Filter?
PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2006 11:43 pm 
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NO!!!

The K&N filter and other like it were originally designed for racing and to keep the air just clean enough to last the life of the engine which was generally one or two races between rebuilding. The one thing you always see on the filters of this type is there is a lot of sales hype and never any proof as to filtering abiity. K&N acutally states if I remember correctly 97% filtering ability, OEM is generally 98% to 99.5% and the difference between what that claimed 97% difference is and OEM is mind stagering in the amount of dirt past into the engine.

The real proof of the pudding was ISO testing on a GM Duramax Diesel and engine oil sampling from VW TDI diesels a couple years ago on TDI Club Forum. The increase of silicon (Si is dirt) in the oil was on the order of 5 to as much 10 fold increase over normal. That is 500% to 1000% increase of the dirt into the oil by the way.

One other point, people buy these for is to incrase HP output. Actual dyno testing on VW TDI diesels (VW's have same turbo as the CRD and is IC system) only showed HP increase of less then one hp for the diesel and a turbo gasser. On the speed channel one day they did a bunch of preformance mods on a new '05 V8 Mustang and after each mod they checked output on the dyno. The V8 picked up 8 hp for the K&N ram system, they acted a little embarresed but went on with other mods. I didn't think the K&N cone syatem used was a good return on the $300 cost.

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 Post subject: What are some ways to increase power & MPG's?
PostPosted: Wed Dec 13, 2006 9:00 pm 
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One thing to remember with a turbo diesel to increase the HP without a bigger volume turbo you can only due a few things that will give any real measure of power increase.

1. Add more fuel by bigger injectors

2. Chip for the engine to increase turbo boost and fuel delivery durration.

3. Remove the muffler this is the cheapest mod you can do and probably only real way to get a MPG increase. This will lower EGT's, help the turbo spool up a little faster which should increase 0>60 time some. This can be done for as little as $30 to $50 for the DIY guy to less the $100 at a muffler shop.

If you are not going to chip or go to larger injectors then no need to do a fancy high $$$$ stainless steel CAT back system, as you would never recoupe your expence in fuel savings. However it is a fun thing to do and is always cool to point out the fancy pipe and muffler to your friends.

The muffler mod can be done without excessive noise or drone depending on whether a replacement straight pipe or straight through muffler is used.

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 Post subject: Avoiding Oil Filter Change Mess.
PostPosted: Thu Dec 21, 2006 12:43 pm 
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When changing the oil filter the thing wants to drip oil all over the tranny skid and cross member. I have tried puncturing and allowing it to drain with no real success. I tried shop towels and the oil soaked through and made even bigger mess when I dropped one on the floor.

Yesterday I found the cure for the problem, it was so simple as to be almost funny. I went into kitchen and tore off about a 15" of the wife's aluminum cooking foil and put it up over the cross member and skid then around the back of oil filter, this will make it form an almost perfect pour spout for draining the spilled oil. Then I just loosened up the filter and let it drain into a small collection pan that I have, then I was able then to screw it the rest of the way off W/O any spilling on the floor of the garage.

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 Post subject: Why am I not getting the mileage I expected?
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 8:13 am 
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1. Vehicle design. While the 2.8L CRD is of the recent breed of small and efficient diesel engines, the Jeep Liberty CRD is still a 4300 lb brick-on-wheels. The inherent limits posed on attainable mileage by its high weight and poor aerodynamics make it not so comparable to the sub-3000 lb Volkswagen TDI’s with 70% of the drag coefficient. Owner-reported mileage generally ranges right around the EPA estimate of 21/26, although the highway figure seems to often be exceeded by 2-4 mpg. Your mileage may vary, primarily according to the following.

2. Driving content. Stop-and-go driving kills our mileage more than any other factor. While owners report 30+ mpg on the highway, city driving mileage is consistently very near the EPA estimate of 21 mpg. The main reason for this is the sheer weight of the vehicle---it simply takes energy to get mass moving. However, this effect is compounded by our automatic transmission’s torque converter, which loses energy as heat whenever its clutch is unlocked. While this inefficiency is increased by any acceleration, it is further aggravated by vehicle weight, and so the CRD suffers more to this effect than would a lighter vehicle. The practical result is that any acceleration will have a significant negative impact, but since the clutch locks at ~53 mph with overdrive selected or ~42 mph unselected, efficiency is particularly degraded by the amount of acceleration done accordingly under those speeds, or by acceleration/deceleration that prevents the torque converter from locking or remaining locked, such as that caused by very curvy or hilly roads.

3. Tires. Tire rolling resistance is probably the largest influence on mileage following vehicle design and the type of driving done. To improve efficiency, choose tires with a lower designed rolling resistance and inflate them to a higher pressure. Tire width, tread design, and rubber compound are the design characteristics affecting rolling resistance. A narrower width is always better; the other factors vary and are difficult to determine although tire category is a general guide. Tire reviews and tests, such as those found on TireRack.com, can be helpful. Increasing tire pressure degrades ride but improves rolling resistance, handling, and longevity. The tire pressure recommendations placarded on the vehicle are designed by the OEM to provide that plush, solid feel that most buyers want, but at the expense of mileage, handling, and longevity. They have nothing to do with safety. Disregard OEM recommendations and fill your tires to suit your preference, within the actual safety limits posted on the tires themselves. Most tires used on autos today like to be in the 38-40 psi range some even higher.

4. Engine Break-in. Turbodiesels must be broken-in before optimum mileage is attained, which can take quite a while (some say upwards of 60,000 miles). You can hasten this by moderately loading the engine (towing, hard acceleration) whenever you can during the break-in period. Engine treatment can also permanently determine your engine's characteristics. Extended high-rpm operation can cause cylinder glazing while excessive idling can result in glaze-like cylinder deposits, both of which are permanent detriments to efficiency, power, and emissions. Extended high-rpm operation probably isn't an issue for us in the U.S. (given the 545RFE) but excessive idling may be for some. Don’t confuse the common idling of tractors and trailers for climate control or accessory needs and turbodiesels for turbo cool-down as examples for the harmlessness of idling. Diesel idling will be covered by another FAQ.

5. Fuel. A higher cetane fuel will provide better mileage as well as more power. Diesel #2 in the U.S. typically ranges 40-45 cetane but higher rated, premium fuel can be found. Winterized diesel fuel has a lower energy content than Diesel #2, and therefore mileage and power suffers slightly with its use. This is why a seasonal drop in mileage is experienced by most throughout the winter. You can always boost your cetane by the use of an additive.

6. Driving style. Minimize your braking by slowing-down and anticipating. All energy dissipated by the brakes is fuel L.O.S.T.. Decrease your highway speed. Optimum highway mileage will occur somewhere between 58-70 mph while in 5th gear, probably near the torque peak at 1800-2000 rpm. Mileage decreases rapidly above ~70 mph due to aerodynamic drag while the transmission shifts into 5th at ~64 mph but will remain in 5th until vehicle speed drops below ~58 mph. Use overdrive whenever possible. Although the torque converter locks-up at ~42 mph (~11 mph earlier) with overdrive deselected, it doesn’t compensate for the loss of efficiency that results from the lower gearing.



This is a good article on breaking-in a diesel: Diesel Stop

You can find good discussion on breaking-in a diesel like ours at TDI Forum

Here's a nicely comprehensive list of fuel economy tips: Improving Fuel Economy

Submited by forum member BioJeep.

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 Post subject: What is a AIR INTAKE TEMP SENSOR? AKA MAP Sensor!!!
PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2007 12:15 am 
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The ECM/PCM depends on the data coming from this dual sensor (AKA MAP Sensor but refered to as Boost Pressure Sensor in FSM) - both intake air temperature and air pressure are measured with this sensor. The ECM/PCM in turn uses this information to calculate how much fuel to inject into the cylinders - so this sensor has a direct relationship to the power, efficiency, fuel economy and soot output of the engine. The egr design is going to be an ongoing maintenance issue with this and any other egr equipped diesel. This soot will cause degraded sensor performance problems due to carbon buildup in the intake system and anything in its path negatively affected by soot and carbon buildup. It will also affect ring wear and engine longevity. I use chlorine free disk brake cleaner from the auto parts store to clean the sensor. That said I not sure if any cleaner we could buy at the parts store would harm the sensor seeing how "tuff" this thing has to be to work where it is located.

Ranger1's thinking is (I agree) with all that soot buildup, the ECM was using stored values, as temperature and boost couldn't possibly be measured correctly with that clogging. I'm deducing that on the temperature, the soot acted as an insulator, keeping the cold readings for too long on warmup, causing overfueling, and kept heat on the sensor once the engine was up to temperature, causing underfueling on longer trips.

This looks to be a 5000 mile/7500 kilometers cleaning job to have a proper running engine with current fuel. We can only hope ULSD may drastically change this for us.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

1. This is the sensor after removal, it requires a 4 mm allen wrench and I left the wiring attached in case I dropped the thing while removing. There is a tension washer under the screw and will require a magnet most likely to remove it from the manifold. Just lift the tab and pull the sensor off the warring harness. I didn't disconnect the battery before doing the cleaning, but I had no problem. However it might be wise to disconnect the cables to prevent any problems. One thing I did was remove the three holding nuts for the wiring harness to ease removal, but it is probably not necessary for most people.
Image

2. This is where it pluggs into on the manifold.
Image

3. This is a members sensor and it is solid crud.
Image

4. This is the sensor from my CRD at 21,700 miles, and it was packed solid.
Image

5. This is mine after cleaning.
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Last edited by oldnavy on Mon Apr 16, 2007 7:28 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject: How do you install a Provent oil/air separator???
PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 9:21 pm 
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Quote:
Mann-Hummel Provent will run you about $130 call them for price quote. The Provent 200 is rated for up to 200hp on any diesel.

I did mine as close to as listed below. This should help.

Ok, so here's my install. This was done after 2 days of frustration at my inability to find 1"ID fuel or heater hose that would fit onto the ProVent so no comments about my redneck methods (I grew up in Oklahoma so come by it honestly)

DZL_LOU



Parts list:
1"ID to 3/4" ID copper plumbing fitting
3/4" ID Clear Plastic Hose (nylon reinforced)
1/2" ID Clear Plastic Hose (nylon reinforced)
1/2" barb and cap fitting
5 hose clamps

Everything came from the plumbing aisle at Home Depot.

See here for pics:
http://www.one-ring.net/jeep/gallery/vi ... nt-install

1)The day before, glue the reduction fittings to the ProVent. Just goop up plenty of gasket maker around the ProVent fittings, press on the copper fitting and let dry overnight.

2)Remove the plastic sound housing from the top of the engine
-unscrew oil filler cap
-remove cover - it's just press-fit w/ rubber grommets.

3)Remove the airbox
-unplug the sensor wires from airbox top - there are 2
-remove top
-remove air filter
-remove airbox bottom (it's just press-fit w/ rubber grommets)

I removed the hose from the Turbo to the Intercooler to give myself more room - not sure if I needed to do this now. There was oil in this large line.

4)Remove existing CCV line. See the pics for the line to remove. the CCV end is easy, the turbo end was a PITA. Since I knew I was replacing it I just cut it off (slit from the end and it'll slide right off). There was oil in this line also. No wonder the intecoolers gunk up on these things.

5)Cut and install drain tube on ProVent - I used 16"

6)Cut and install heater hose onto ProVent (I ended up w/ 19" for the top [input] hose and 16" for the bottom [output]).

7)Install ProVent. It's a tight fit but it'll drop in. I put a tie-wrap (zip-tie) around the ProVent and the vacuum thing in front of it. But it hasn't moved in a couple hundred miles.

8)Reinstall the airbox - getting the top back on sucks but it'll go.

That's it. I'm watching the glued fittings but so far it all looks good, no oil anywhere.

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 Post subject: Another cause of Turbo boost failure on CRD
PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2007 8:56 am 
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Five or six years ago members of Fred's VW TDI forum discovered that failing to fully actuate the linkage of the VW 1.9L Turbo diesel led to clogged vanes on the Garret VNT turbo, during this period it was also discovered that here was also a problem from corroded external mechanicals. It was eventually discovered or proven that the problem was only occurring on cars that owners were always driving for MPG's and not driving a diesel like it was designed to be driven WOT when accelerating. It was discovered that doing a WOT just once a tank could prevent the problem as a general rule, on some cars this was just once a month and it was the opinion of some of the Diesel Guru's that under right weather/road conditions this WOT should be done once a week on the VW due to location of the turbo in the engine compartment.

Pretty much the same thing applys to the CRD to prevent the same problem.

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 Post subject: MAP Sensor Operation
PostPosted: Sat Mar 17, 2007 10:35 pm 
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The MAP sensor is used as an input to the Powertrain Control Module (PCM). It contains a silicon based sensing unit to provide data on the manifold vacuum that draws the air/fuel mixture into the combustion chamber. The PCM requires this information to determine injector pulse width and spark advance. When manifold absolute pressure (MAP) equals Barometric pressure, the pulse width will be at maximum.

A 5 volt reference is supplied from the PCM and returns a voltage signal to the PCM that reflects manifold pressure. The zero pressure reading is 0.5V and full scale is 4.5V. For a pressure swing of 0–15 psi, the voltage changes 4.0V. To operate the sensor, it is supplied a regulated 4.8 to 5.1 volts. Ground is provided through the low-noise, sensor return circuit at the PCM.

The MAP sensor input is the number one contributor to fuel injector pulse width. The most important function of the MAP sensor is to determine barometric pressure. The PCM needs to know if the vehicle is at sea level or at a higher altitude, because the air density changes with altitude. It will also help to correct for varying barometric pressure. Barometric pressure and altitude have a direct inverse correlation; as altitude goes up, barometric goes down. At key-on, the PCM powers up and looks at MAP voltage, and based upon the voltage it sees, it knows the current barometric pressure (relative to altitude). Once the engine starts, the PCM looks at the voltage again, continuously every 12 milliseconds, and compares the current voltage to what it was at key-on. The difference between current voltage and what it was at key-on, is manifold vacuum.

During key-on (engine not running) the sensor reads (updates) barometric pressure. A normal range can be obtained by monitoring a known good sensor.

As the altitude increases, the air becomes thinner (less oxygen). If a vehicle is started and driven to a very different altitude than where it was at key-on, the barometric pressure needs to be updated. Any time the PCM sees Wide Open Throttle (WOT), based upon Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) angle and RPM, it will update barometric pressure in the MAP memory cell. With periodic updates, the PCM can make its calculations more effectively.

The PCM uses the MAP sensor input to aid in calculating the following:

Manifold pressure
Barometric pressure
Engine load
Injector pulse-width
Spark-advance programs
Shift-point strategies (certain automatic transmissions only)
Idle speed
Decel fuel shutoff

The MAP sensor signal is provided from a single piezoresistive element located in the center of a diaphragm. The element and diaphragm are both made of silicone. As manifold pressure changes, the diaphragm moves causing the element to deflect, which stresses the silicone. When silicone is exposed to stress, its resistance changes. As manifold vacuum increases, the MAP sensor input voltage decreases proportionally. The sensor also contains electronics that condition the signal and provide temperature compensation.

The PCM recognizes a decrease in manifold pressure by monitoring a decrease in voltage from the reading stored in the barometric pressure memory cell. The MAP sensor is a linear sensor; meaning as pressure changes, voltage changes proportionately. The range of voltage output from the sensor is usually between 4.6 volts at sea level to as low as 0.3 volts at 26 in. of Hg. Barometric pressure is the pressure exerted by the atmosphere upon an object. At sea level on a standard day, no storm, barometric pressure is approximately 29.92 in Hg. For every 100 feet of altitude, barometric pressure drops 0.10 in. Hg. If a storm goes through, it can change barometric pressure from what should be present for that altitude. You should know what the average pressure and corresponding barometric pressure is for your area.

Thanks to DZL_LOU for this info.

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 Post subject: ORM, aka: Off Road Mod. What is it and how is it done?
PostPosted: Tue Apr 10, 2007 9:16 am 
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ORM is short for OFF ROAD MODIFICATION. The orm consists of unplugging the Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensor. The MAF is between the turbo and the air box. By disconnecting you disable the EGR. By turning off the EGR you improve your fuel milage and power greatly. Also you set off the check engine light (CEL) by disconnecting the MAF. It is called the ORM because it is not necessarily a legal modification unless you are driving offroad.

As you're looking at the connector, pull the red clip back towards you (slides towards the wires). You should be able to do it w/ just your fingernail, but a coin or something similar may help. Once the red tab is extended, mash down on the tap and the connector just pulls/slides off.

The ORM increases the MPG's, smooths out the engine and make it more responsive while reducing all the soot you would deposit on the trees. IF ONLY USING OFF ROAD the oil will clear up and not be soot black after a couple of oil changes.


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 Post subject: General location of things under the hood.
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2007 5:07 pm 
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 Post subject: EGR & FCV Location
PostPosted: Sat Jun 02, 2007 9:47 am 
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This is actual picture of EGR Valve that has been removed.

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 Post subject: How to Change fuel Filter by Endurance
PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2007 9:00 pm 
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What you will need: Flat head screwdriver, zip tie, rag(s), also hose clamps would be helpful but not necessary.

Changing the fuel filter is not hard at all and can be easily done in 1 hour or less the first time.

1. Disconnect the plugs and hoses circled on the picture

2. You can zip tie the two hoses off to the side so they wouldn’t be in my way when removing the filter or let them hang loose.

3. Disconnect the water sensor on the bottom of the fuel filter.

4. Twist the fuel filter in order to remove it. Righty tighty, lefty loosey.

5. Unscrew the drain valve from the filter that connects to the water sensor plug and screw it on to the new filter. Be careful not to break the thing.

6. Lubricate the rubber grommet of the filter before you install it. You can use a little vaseline.

7. Install the filter and tighten approx 1/4 to 1/2 turn then connect all hoses and plugs.

8. Now use the manual pump that’s on top of the fuel filter assembly to get the air out of the system. Pump a couple of times and then open the bleeding screw for a short amount of time. Do this until there is a steady stream of fuel with no indication of air bubbles. I would recommend towels or drain hose to prevent fuel from being pumped onto top of engine.

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