It is currently Fri Nov 24, 2017 5:12 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 28 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Recipe: OldNavy Alphabet Soup Ingredients:EGRCCVPRCACEGRFCV
PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2007 7:50 am 
Offline
Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member

Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2005 8:23 am
Posts: 3539
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Idea and Title by DarbyWalters...Write Up by oldnavy...Thanx to OldNavy for taking the time to gather all this info
^(1% inspiration)^......................^(99% persperation)^

This Thread will be CLEANED every few days so try to keep it relevant

CCV/Pressure Regulator:
Image
Image


What we call CCV, D/C calls a Pressure Regulator and serves to vent the engine blow-by gases into the intake for burning thus reducing emissions from the engine. This unit is also a pressure regulator to help ensure that turbo pressure does not over come the venting process. The problem with this idea is that there is little to no back pressue to the CCV, the hose is plumbed to the intake side of the turbo just down from the air cleaner and has a very small negative pressure or sucsion on the vent hose. The design of the PR is to also act as an oil catch and drain back system that will keep oil from the intake CAC (Charged Air Cooler, also called InterCooler) system. We are all witness to the sucess of this system. All that would have been required is to have left out the pressure valve and made a filter assembly about the same size with drain back to engine.

My knowledge of this type of CCV/PR system is from experience with VW TDI diesel engines and designing, building and selling a filter unit for the VW that was and is still a sucess, with 2 or 3 people contacting me monthly for a filter for their VW. Here is a link to Old Navy CCV filter http://www.stancomachine.com/CCV.htm with picture of the filter I designed and had built by local shop and with pictures of the OEM CCV or PR as VW also calls the device.

Now for the Elephant Hose Mod:
Image


This is the Elephant Hose Mod at time of install.

Image


This is after about 300 miles of mainly around town driving. I am sure that most will agree that this does not need to be in the CAC system.

INSTRUCTIONS: Remove the engine cover by unscrewing the Oil Cap first. Then the Engine Cover will just pull off by pulling up the front first and then the back. There will be four rubber mounts...make sure that any of the rubber plugs that remain on the posts are placed back on the Engine Cover. Next remove the hose from the CCV...it will just pull off. Plug the hose you pulled off and zip tie it near the winshield washer resevoir. Now attach your clear 4FT Long 3/4" ID hose to the CCV and run the hose to the driver side of the engine and down toward the ground. Zip Tie it along the way to keep it secure. You can also Zip Tie or Hose Clamp the Clear Hose on the CCV but not too tight. Pop the engine cover back on and screw on the oil cap...YOU ARE DONE! If you want to add a catch bottle at the end of the EMH, you can to catch any oil that might drip after collecting in the hose. It should not be a very big amount at all.
WARNING: This mod modifies your emmision controls and will cause it to fail Vehicle Inspection Requirements. Specifically it defeats the Crankcase Gas Recirculation function. Until a fix is found for the problems discussed above, it is a way to avoid some CCV/EGR/PR problems.


Provent Filter Mod:
Image
Image



Above is the Provent installed on another member's CRD. Notice as to how this set-up is shoe horned in and has a very hard to rig hose connecting system for the average person. This is a very good system and works great, the problem is it has to be maintained (not too much trouble) cost $140 to $200 depending on where you buy the filter and how much waste you have with the plumbing materials.

The downside is this unit was known to freeze up on VW TDI owners, as has the Elephant Hose Mod, when a lot of ice and snow on low ground clearance cars get splached on hoses or filter (depending on where mounted, VW's had room problem also) and when the moisture that comes out from short trips usage freezes up in hoses and or filter, as it will in a CRD under those conditions. Those who had this problem were people who just drove a short distance to work and parked the vehicle for the day in sub freezing weather. Then on return trip home same thing happens, but this time the drive doen't thaw all the moisture and blow it out so it freezes again during the night and after a few days of this it freezes up. When the venting is closed off it has caused seal failure and big repair bills. This can be easly avoided by letting the engine run enough to get moisture out of the crank case/oil system and regular checking the devices in the winter or parking in a heated garage as we do.

EGR & EGR Flow Control Valve:

Below is a picture from the FSC (Factory Sevice Manual) showing the location of the EGR & EGR FCV on the driver side of the vehicle.
Image

The EGR FCV (also called a anti shudder valve) is located on the mouth of the intake manifold with the CAC hose connected to the EGR FCV. The FLV surves only one purpose and that is to ease in the shut down of the engine when you turn the key off, it also helps to prevent or lessen the effect of a diesel runaway engine. This runaway can happen if the turbo seals blow, you were to break a piston ring, or blow a hole in the top of a piston. Again as I said this FCV serves a dual purpose but most of use will only relate to the smooth shut down it provides the diesel engine.



The EGR is totally different beast and is not really related to the FCV/Anti shudder valve. The EGR valve is the main emissions control component in the exhaust gas recirculation system. The valve is located on the intake manifold, and opens a small passageway between the exhaust and intake manifold to allow a metered amount of exhaust to flow back into the engine. This reduces combustion temperatures and helps control the formation of oxides of nitrogen. The EGR valve is opened by an electronic solenoid on the CRD, while some mfg's use vacuum to operate the EGR. The valve should remain closed while the engine is cold and warming up, at idle or at full throttle. It should only open once the engine has warmed up and is running at part-throttle. If the valve sticks shut (or is disconnected), NOX emissions will soar but have little effect on the running of the diesel. If it sticks in the open position or fails to close all the way, it acts like a vacuum leak resulting in a rough idle, hesitation and possible stalling.

High EGR flow is required during cruising and mid range operation.
Low EGR flow is required during light loads and low speed operation.
No EGR flow is required for Idle, warm up and wide open throttle.

This is why the people who drove the VW TDI's at low rpm's or as some would say babied the engine for mileage had the manifolds clog up rather quickly (20k to 30k miles) and those who did regular full throttle runs or as some called it "drove it like they stole it" had far longer periods between intake cleaning, often getting 2 to 3 times the miles on car before the cleaning was needed. In otherwords when we cruise down the road at 68 to 70 mph trying to get max mpg's we soot the engine up the worst that at any other time.

_________________
Founder of L.O.S.T.
2006 CRD Sport

Mods: GDE Hot Tune w/ 364#@2000rpm/Air Box /3" Str8 Exhaust/ASFIR Alum Skids/245-75R-16 Cooper STT PRO/OME LIFT w/Clevis & 4 Spring Isos/AirTabs/Rigid 10" S2 LED/4xGuard Ctr Matrix Bumper
Drag Strip:Reac=.1078_60ft=2.224_1/8=10.39@64.8mph_1/4+16.46@80.8mph


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 5:28 pm 
Offline
Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member

Joined: Tue Sep 18, 2007 7:21 pm
Posts: 3092
Location: Texas
I just reworked the Provent system on my son's '05 with 53kmi, recently member Boxhead's well-maintained CRD - the filter was black, of course (it is a Diesel!), and saturated (not good) - so I took some disposable super-absorbent spill-cleanup towels and evacuated the oil from the filter cannister and also the filter element - the element media began to lighten up as the liquid was absorbed, such that I felt confident that some vapor-removal function had been restored, until we could get replacement filter element.

I was explaining the CCV theory and Provent advantage in this type system, so with the engine running at operating temps, I removed the oil filler cap to demonstrate the concept of blowby and vapor in a good-running engine - I then replaced the cap and removed the Provent cap to illustrate an open system, such as on my Cummins, which is medium-duty rated and not required to have the light-duty rated emissions equipment.

The seminar was not totally successful, as even repeated dry-sopping of the Provent filter left it saturated enough to where the slight vacuum at the turbo inlet was insufficient to pull the vapors thru and create the slight depression in the crankcase.

Same blowby at the filler cap with the Provent cap on or off - same blowby at the provent cannister with the cap off - same black spots appearing on my shirt and face and arms and glasses and the engine and hood and fenders and..........well, you get my drift.

Needless to say, replacing the filter element is imperative to system function - a year may be too long to wait - we've had this little Jeep only one week, so I have no feel for actual service interval, but I feel it may be much sooner than one year as mileage accrues.

Check yours today........................

_________________
'05 CRD Limited
Pricol EGT, Boost
GDE Hot '11; EDGE Trail switched
SEGR; Provent; Magnaflow;
Suncoast T\C, Transgo Tow'n'Go switch;
Cummins LP module, Fleetguard filter, Filterminder
2.5" Daystar f, OME r; Ranchos; K80767's, Al's lifted uppers
Rubicons, 2.55 Goodyears
Four in a row really makes it go


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 7:15 pm 
Offline
Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 9:59 pm
Posts: 5157
Location: Austin, TX
The Provent isn't really a filter, it's more of a condensation 'trap' for lack of a better word. The oil is in suspension in the air - caused by moving parts hitting oil drops in the crankcase. As soon as the drops hit anything solid they condense out - and run down to the bottom of the Provent. So the key on whether it's working is the amount of oil collecting in the bottom hose - not how black the element is. The Provent is sized for an engine 3x the size of the CRD - you should only have to change the element if it's damaged. I've got a clear hose on the exit of mine - if it starts getting dirty - that would be a problem and it's not.

_________________
2005 CRD
stuff
Skeptic quod gratis asseritur, gratis negatur


Last edited by ATXKJ on Wed Sep 26, 2007 5:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 11:41 pm 
Offline
Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member

Joined: Tue Sep 18, 2007 7:21 pm
Posts: 3092
Location: Texas
The system functions when the crankcase is "depressed", or at a slight vacuum - this is done by plumbing the turbo compressor inlet, the source of the vacuum, to the lower port on the Provent cannister, which is the outside surface of the media - and which port, coincidentally, is a vacuum regulator valve - then plumbing the top port of the cannister, which is the inside surface of the media, to the cam cover "breather", or CCV, another vacuum regulator valve - the media element is o-ringed, creating two chambers: outside chamber for the inlet vacuum source, inside chamber for inlet from CCV, and drain - system function is completed by plumbing the drain at the bottom of the cannister back to the crankcase, above sump oil level - thus the "depressed" crankcase will aid gravity in evacuating the condensed oil - the media passes the lighter gasses thru the interstices, traps the heavier vapors on the strands (fits the strictest definition of a filter, right?) allowing the oil to condense and gravitate downward as the system cools when the engine is stopped - when the interstices are bridged by excessive liquid oil, the filter is saturated, and can no longer pass the lighter gasses.

So, the slight vacuum on the CCV system, ~2"H2O at idle, ~4-6"H2O at 2000rpm, is not enough to "draw" thru fully saturated filter media, particularly where the system was never designed for that media to be there - the key to operation is slow saturation over a period of miles until full saturation is reached, with media replacement at that time - this filter media oozed oil from top to bottom, 360deg - repeated sopping did not clear the media - the engine has 53kmi, and I'm uncertain of actual installation mileage and date, but I'm hoping it is more than a year ago EDIT: MAR 07 @~48kmi

You can do a quick-test for CCV\Provent functional operation, providing the drain is not open to the atmosphere -

remove the engine oil dipstick

place a 4-6' length of 3/8" clear vinyl hose over the dipstick tube, such that it fits tightly and seals the open end - if it doesn't fit tightly, use a tyrap

place the other end of the tubing in a container of water situated well below dipstick level, where you can clearly see the tubing as it enters the surface of the water - add some red Easter-egg dye to the water to make it more visible, if necessary - keep the tubing reasonably vertical above the water level so there is no siphon effect

have someone start the engine while you observe the tubing

the water should travel up the tubing several inches at 2000rpm, indicating the crankcase is at some low vacuum level

if the water does not move into the tube the system is not functional - check for leaks or saturated condensate media, or filter, in the vernacular - or the drain is open

If bubbles appear in the water, the system is stopped up and you are seeing blowby, or you are seeing blowby in excess of system capability - if a lot of bubbles appear, resembling a bunch of piranha on a tapir, blowby has increased due to wear - only reliable guage for blowby volume is if you had tested the system when the engine had low miles, or your buddy runs a test on his (or her) low mileage engine.

_________________
'05 CRD Limited
Pricol EGT, Boost
GDE Hot '11; EDGE Trail switched
SEGR; Provent; Magnaflow;
Suncoast T\C, Transgo Tow'n'Go switch;
Cummins LP module, Fleetguard filter, Filterminder
2.5" Daystar f, OME r; Ranchos; K80767's, Al's lifted uppers
Rubicons, 2.55 Goodyears
Four in a row really makes it go


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2007 6:19 pm 
Offline
Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 9:59 pm
Posts: 5157
Location: Austin, TX
I don’t argue that the Turbo can pull a vacuum through the crankcase – (nice manometer for low pressure measurements).
But the entire concept of a closed crankcase system – is that the crankcase is pressurized from ring blowby – the pressure causes the oil mist in the crankcase to vent to the atmosphere – so some of the 1st emission controls were to reduce this venting – so they fed it into the intake to get rid of the oil mist. The fact that the turbo drops the pressure is a byproduct of the way it’s plumbed, it’s not the intent, and I’ve seen nothing that indicates it’s required. The intent is to stop the mist from venting into the air. The Provent won't work if it's clogged – but the separator element black for oil – is not clogged – it’s working.

http://www.reliableindustries.com/catalog/MNH/ProVent1.pdf

_________________
2005 CRD
stuff
Skeptic quod gratis asseritur, gratis negatur


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2007 7:40 pm 
Offline
Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member

Joined: Tue Sep 18, 2007 7:21 pm
Posts: 3092
Location: Texas
That's a good read - thanks - but you'll note that they carefully pussyfoot around the filter\separator element maintenance theme, stating only that fittings are not removed during element maintenance, and to service the separator consult operating and service instructions or engine manufacturer.

Here's a quote from the Racor site, concerning the filter element in the identical function American version of the Provent: When the filter becomes severely restricted through time in service, the crankcase pressure will increase to a predetermined value, causing the diaphragm valve to move upward into by-pass position, limiting the maximum crankcase pressure that can be generated. An indicator located in the top cover of the assembly registers when the unit is operating in by-pass mode and the filter element must be replaced.

And here's the link:
http://www.parker.com/EAD/displayCatalo ... de=Details

You're correct - no mention of necessity of vacuum is mentioned - however, the turbo inlet does develop vacuum, more as rpm and air flow increases, which must be dealt with in a turbocharged system in order to restrict 'drawing' raw oil from the engine.

You'll notice, looking at Old Navy's pics of the CCV system, that the pressure regulator is also a centrifugal filter, intended to sling the heavier component of the vapor to a drain - it is an oil separator - the regulator portion works as a vacuum regulator and crankcase pressure regulator - when vacuum increases such that draw is greater than normal crankcase flow, the valve closes off to prevent raw oil extraction - if crankcase blowby flow rises, increasing crankcase pressure, the high-vacuum closed valve is forced open, allowing some pressure to vent thru the system - in this way, max pressure is regulated, and max vacuum is regulated.

So - we must deal with vacuum, and take advantage of the availability when installing and using the Provent or any other system - as indicated above, a saturated filter does not pass filtered gasses into the intake, and must be serviced, meaning replaced

The Provent lid has a vented pressure valve from the inlet chamber - purpose is to vent to atmosphere when the filter is saturated, preventing excessive crankcase pressure - there is considerable black oil in the upper inlet chamber near the inlet port, and considerable black oil on the outside of our Provent, indicating the pop-off valve has been venting - certain indication that the filter element was saturated past it's designed service life.

_________________
'05 CRD Limited
Pricol EGT, Boost
GDE Hot '11; EDGE Trail switched
SEGR; Provent; Magnaflow;
Suncoast T\C, Transgo Tow'n'Go switch;
Cummins LP module, Fleetguard filter, Filterminder
2.5" Daystar f, OME r; Ranchos; K80767's, Al's lifted uppers
Rubicons, 2.55 Goodyears
Four in a row really makes it go


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2007 8:51 pm 
Offline
Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 9:59 pm
Posts: 5157
Location: Austin, TX
I didn't realize you were blowing the pressure vent - it's set for 50mbarr (my conversions says 20" H2O)
I thought you were looking at the filter being saturated and black. My filter's saturated and black - but it's not blowing the pressure release. I don't think you can tell by looking at it - it would be nice if it had the Racor's indicator

_________________
2005 CRD
stuff
Skeptic quod gratis asseritur, gratis negatur


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2007 10:13 pm 
Offline
Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member

Joined: Tue Sep 18, 2007 7:21 pm
Posts: 3092
Location: Texas
27"H2O = 2"HG = 1psi, so that's less than 1 psi blowoff - not much crankcase pressure - the regulator is set to limit turbo inlet vacuum to ~6"H2O max, so had the filter been functional, the system would work - still need to see how the drain port is terminated on the little Jeep - crankcase or plug - guess I'll address that and some other stuff while it's got 4-wheel air, when the t\c and shiftkit goes in

_________________
'05 CRD Limited
Pricol EGT, Boost
GDE Hot '11; EDGE Trail switched
SEGR; Provent; Magnaflow;
Suncoast T\C, Transgo Tow'n'Go switch;
Cummins LP module, Fleetguard filter, Filterminder
2.5" Daystar f, OME r; Ranchos; K80767's, Al's lifted uppers
Rubicons, 2.55 Goodyears
Four in a row really makes it go


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2007 9:50 am 
Offline
Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 9:59 pm
Posts: 5157
Location: Austin, TX
I think everyone went using the Provent with a plug on the end of a 1-2' tube - it only vents about 1 oz/1000 miles - so you can drain the hose every 2-3 weeks - in order to drain back to the crankcase you'd need to drill a hole and I don't remember anyone mentioning that.

Boxhead's install photo's are gone - but in his post he mentioned a capped line
http://www.lostjeeps.com/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?t=2367&highlight=provent+install

_________________
2005 CRD
stuff
Skeptic quod gratis asseritur, gratis negatur


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2007 10:52 am 
Offline
Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member

Joined: Tue Sep 18, 2007 7:21 pm
Posts: 3092
Location: Texas
Thanks - that was his first Provent - removed it later because it saturated at ~6kmi and he thought it was not worth the hassle (reading between the lines, here)

Lost that cannister in a garage cleanout, bought and installed a new one MAR07, but no ref to configuration - that new one was absolutely saturated from MAR to SEPT - bypass venting indicates it is also capped or valved

Wanting to start from a clean baseline reference, I installed all new 3/4" hosing and 3/4" brass fittings to ensure equal diameter throughout, but did not pull the cannister, assuming it was tied into the crankcase - that was B4 #2 son located Boxhead via SEARCH - I have since intensely scrutinized all his posts

The little Jeep got F37 with t\c and pump in MAR07, so Suncoast is on it's way and will be installed B4 that plastic t\c craters and fnorks up the works

_________________
'05 CRD Limited
Pricol EGT, Boost
GDE Hot '11; EDGE Trail switched
SEGR; Provent; Magnaflow;
Suncoast T\C, Transgo Tow'n'Go switch;
Cummins LP module, Fleetguard filter, Filterminder
2.5" Daystar f, OME r; Ranchos; K80767's, Al's lifted uppers
Rubicons, 2.55 Goodyears
Four in a row really makes it go


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 30, 2007 11:44 pm 
Offline
LOST Junkie

Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2006 9:39 pm
Posts: 676
Location: Saylorsburg, PA
After you've removed the factory intake hose from the CCV filter, you can use a bit of 3/4" wooden dowel or a wine cork to plug the hose. No hose clamp is needed as long as the fit is snug, as the intake hose plumbs into the intake before the turbocharger and is not under pressure. (Credit goes to BiodieselJeep.com for the cork idea!)

- Chris

_________________
Used to own:
2006 CRD Sport
Suncoast TC, Transgo shift kit, Inmotion, ORM, EHM, Magnaflow SS exhaust, Fumoto valve, EVIC added, Hensley TruControl brake controller, Pirelli Scorpion ATR LR-D in spring/summer/fall, FIA winter front and Blizzaks in winter


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 25, 2008 11:38 am 
Offline
Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2005 10:26 pm
Posts: 2189
Location: Sin City USA
so what exactly does the EHM do or prevent from happening? I have noticed a burning smell as well as light smoke after driving around for a while after doing the EHM...

_________________
2016 JKU RUBICON

other mods coming soon...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 25, 2008 3:54 pm 
Offline
Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member

Joined: Tue Sep 18, 2007 7:21 pm
Posts: 3092
Location: Texas
Medium-duty (Dodge Cummins) and heavy-duty (Kenworth, Peterbuilt, Mack, Cat, etc) Diesel engines are allowed to vent crankcase effluent to the atmosphere, but with a similar pot-scrubber type fume\vapor condenser in the path, inside the engine - thus, fewer raw vapors out the breather tube, but still raw vapors

Light-duty Diesel engines, meant for passenger vehicle service, must meet passenger vehicle emissions regulations, therefore, the crankcase effluent is plumbed back around into the intake, to be consumed in the combustion cycle - makes the tree-huggers happy, until you start needing more paper for replacement filters, but makes a nasty mess in the intake tract - this is called a Closed Crankcase eVacuation system, and you got one, as do we all.

Enter the EHM, where a breather tube is substituted for the closed crankcase evacuation system as oem-equipped on your CRD KJ - instead of being plumbed back into the intake, the vapors are now being dumped into the atmosphere underneath your engine - you are now smelling what the engine burned B4 you disconnected the CCV system

_________________
'05 CRD Limited
Pricol EGT, Boost
GDE Hot '11; EDGE Trail switched
SEGR; Provent; Magnaflow;
Suncoast T\C, Transgo Tow'n'Go switch;
Cummins LP module, Fleetguard filter, Filterminder
2.5" Daystar f, OME r; Ranchos; K80767's, Al's lifted uppers
Rubicons, 2.55 Goodyears
Four in a row really makes it go


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 25, 2008 4:31 pm 
Offline
Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 9:59 pm
Posts: 5157
Location: Austin, TX
Either the EHM or Provent will prevent engine oil from being deposited in the intercooler and intake manifold.
The stock crankcase ventilation blows about 1oz/thousand miles into the intake (that's what I drain from the Provent)
at first that's not much - but after 100,000 miles - figure more than 3 quarts of oil coating your intake killing performance.
(It's what you clean off of the MAP sensor - but it's coating everything and there's no good way to clean any of it)

_________________
2005 CRD
stuff
Skeptic quod gratis asseritur, gratis negatur


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2008 1:49 am 
Offline
Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member
User avatar

Joined: Sun Dec 30, 2007 2:40 am
Posts: 471
Location: Issaquah, WA
How will my soon to be installed SEGR kit (to shut down the ERG without throwing a CEL) interact with the elephant hose mod? Is the EHM still needed after the SEGR install? I'm getting a bit confused as to what mod fixes what and where some possible redundancies might be. For example, if I get this chipped, part of what the chip controls is the ERG more effectively......but if I get the SEGR kit which just shuts the EGR down then what could the chip possibly do to help that part of it's purpose.
Also, does this EHM take care of the sludge on my MAP sensor? I seems to require my cleaning it rather often so it would be nice if I could leave it alone for a while.
Any thoughs/

_________________
2005 CRD Limited:
* 245/70/16 Nokian Vatiiva
* Magnaflow
* Kennedy Diesel lift pump
* Custom CCV condensor
* Custom modified thermostat housing w/bleeder valve

2006 CRD Limited (wife's)
* Bone stock


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2008 7:30 am 
Offline
LOST Addict

Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2007 2:09 pm
Posts: 1015
Location: Denmark, Europe
EHM will always help. If you did the provent and EHM you would in a sense be doing redundant work.

SEGR is exhaust going into the intake, CCV (EHM) is the blow-by from piston movement going into the intake...

_________________
L.O.S.T forever!
Silver 2002 Skoda Fabia TDI, 235,000km
Former car: Jeep KJ 2003 CRD

DIESEL - saving millions of liters of petrol every day!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 3:58 pm 
Offline
LOST Newbie
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 06, 2007 2:33 pm
Posts: 89
Location: Oklahoma
Wow, great thread!
I gotta stop on the way home and get some EHM supplys!
Question, why does the EHM have to dump down the drivers side? Is there not room to take it down the passenger side or maybe the hose gets crimped when you try to turn it down that close?

_________________
2006 Libby Sport CRD
Future vegi burner!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 19, 2008 12:59 am 
Offline
LOST Newbie

Joined: Tue Sep 12, 2006 12:43 am
Posts: 94
Location: ALASKA
I brought mine down the passenger side by the air box.

_________________
2005 CRD Sport 4x4
EHM,ORM,Straight pipe exhaust,Facet 40109 lift pump


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Recipe: OldNavy Alphabet Soup Ingredients:EGRCCVPRCACEGRFCV
PostPosted: Wed Feb 24, 2010 10:47 am 
Offline
Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Sep 11, 2008 2:03 pm
Posts: 1873
Location: Houston, TX
Bump to stay relevant

_________________
In this war of lines, so many have been crossed. Where will it all stop?

2006 Deep Beryl Green CRD Sport *SOLD 1/22/12*
Provent, V6 Airbox, Fumoto, Samcos, GDE ECO & TCM Tune, Euro JK TC, Magnaflow Catback
245/70/16 Destination A/T's
Boiler's Radiator Skid Plate
Jeepin' By Al 2.5 inch Adjust-A-Strut Lift, JBA Gen 4.5 UCA's (6/5/10)

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Recipe: OldNavy Alphabet Soup Ingredients:EGRCCVPRCACEGR
PostPosted: Sun May 23, 2010 10:39 pm 
Offline
LOST Newbie

Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 1:53 am
Posts: 35
Location: Houston, TX
I did EHM a couple years ago with a 5 ft. vinyl hose which if I remember correctly left it just behind driver's side door. I drive with my windows down very often and there was so much vapor/smoke making it's way up to my window when sitting at red lights I had to disconnect. Since I have been doing a couple other things to the CRD I decided to try again. This time I bought 10 ft. rubber heater hose and ran it all the way down my frame to just behind rear driver side passenger door. Now its like I have a second dumped exhaust. Only thing I'm slightly concerned about is freezing when I take my yearly trip to CO.

_________________
2006 Liberty CRD Sport Black
EHM, ORM, FUMOTO, SAMCO HOSES, SKYJACKER
REBUILT @ 105K
ARP HEAD STUDS


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 28 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group. Color scheme by ColorizeIt!
Logo by pixeldecals.com