It is currently Wed Nov 22, 2017 5:59 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 106 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Improving the OEM Fuel Filter Head/system
PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 11:14 am 
Offline
LOST Junkie

Joined: Sun Jun 11, 2006 10:02 am
Posts: 506
Location: Berlin, CT
I think there is a vast majority of people who are keeping the OEM Fuel Filter head but are worried about air in the system causing stalls and power issues on load (perhaps the ORIGINAL reason for some tranny recalls). I personally see the OEM head as only one of many potential reasons for air leaks (my fuel heater unit certainly burned out)....but certainly not the only source of air. And other heads will STILL have the potential to collect air.

So, I propose a thread for mods to improve the functionality of the existing filter head. Some reasons for air that have been brought up:
1) Normal outgasing of vapors from fuel.
2) Excessive outgassing of vapors from heated fuel
3) Negative pressure system (no lift pump) pulling in air from unknown points on the line
4) Gasket issues with the OEM head
5) Fuel heater burn-out in the OEM head

Some proposed solutions:

1) Unplug the fuel heater plug (driver side one)
2) Install a lift pump (worthy of own thread)
3) T in some sort of "air catcher" on the exit hose from the filter
4) Fuel cooling
5) Gasket changes
6) Move the filter head lower? (my idea..not really practical)

I'd love peoplpe to chime in with the specifics on these solutions (gasket part numbers? Are there any "air catchers" out there?) Please add your thoughts.

_________________
2005 Liberty Sport CRD w/all the fixings
Elephant Hose, MAF (ORM), Amsoil Airfilter, nice when I get to drive it
1 EGRreplacement, but never again.
99.5 FrankenJetta TDI (R.I.P.): being turned into diesel hybrid!
99.5 Replacement Jetta TDI: deal of a lifetime, EHM, some other stuff


Last edited by BiodieselJeep.com on Thu Aug 16, 2007 3:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 11:36 am 
Offline
Banned

Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 2:44 pm
Posts: 1879
Location: Buena Vista, CO
#7 Sell the thing and get something that doesn't have 3 recalls in the first year of ownership, and 4 other warranty related issues. I like driving it and it is fun, but as soon as I reach the break even point, it is gone for a Ranger.

_________________
2006 Sport CRD

Could the Aztecs have known, that in 2012 after a 4 year experiment, our country would cease to exist?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 11:55 am 
Offline
Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member
User avatar

Joined: Sat Apr 15, 2006 12:56 pm
Posts: 1831
Location: Spokane, WA
I would comment on the point of locating the filter lower. When I replaced my fuel filter I didn't really want to disconnect the hoses and add air to the system so I tried to do it from below. There is a lot of room down there to relocate the filter the down side would be reaching the primer pump but then if the air problem was resolved that would not be required. I need to add that I have had little problems there and have only primed my system once when I let it get too low on fuel and when I chnged the filter.

_________________
Dave

'06 CRD Limited, Lt. Khaki, MOPAR Slush Mats/Skids, DrawTite Front Hitch, Mag Lite, Yakima Bars, Thule Bike Rack, Fumoto, ORM, 245/70 Revo 2

Wish list: Lift, Boulder Bars, Something Bigger in the Front and Back, More Lights


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Replace with another OEM if leaks are detected
PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 12:11 pm 
Offline
LOST Member

Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2007 5:46 am
Posts: 163
Location: Dexter Michigan
The funny thing to me is that the "improvements" seem to cause more probelms than the OEM. The 2 fuel pump failures reported on this site both occured after "improvements" to the faulty OEM.

If you have a visible leak, go spend the $150 and replace the part.

How many people have had multiple failures after replacing with a new OEM?

The main thing in my book is to make sure you don't crank trhe starter if you suspect air is in the fuel system. Make sure you have primed and purged before cranking to avoid an unlubricated fuel pump - that is likely the cause of a crater.

_________________
2005 CRD Limited, Black 205k Miles (Timing Belt Changed at 100k and 200k), GDE Eco-Tune, Carter in-tank lift pump
2005 CRD Sport, Black - Ingested Valve at 170k miles R.I.P.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Replace with another OEM if leaks are detected
PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 12:22 pm 
Offline
Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member
User avatar

Joined: Sat Apr 15, 2006 12:56 pm
Posts: 1831
Location: Spokane, WA
fatweasel wrote:
The funny thing to me is that the "improvements" seem to cause more probelms than the OEM. The 2 fuel pump failures reported on this site both occured after "improvements" to the faulty OEM.

If you have a visible leak, go spend the $150 and replace the part.

How many people have had multiple failures after replacing with a new OEM?

The main thing in my book is to make sure you don't crank trhe starter if you suspect air is in the fuel system. Make sure you have primed and purged before cranking to avoid an unlubricated fuel pump - that is likely the cause of a crater.


Yup. The problem is that most CRD's should run like mine and not need to be purged on every startup. That problem doesn't seem to be limited to the folks whom have made mods.

What do our brethern from across the pond or those from OZ have to say here? Are you having the air in fuel problem too? If so has it always been an issue or did it change with the 2.8 and the Bosch filter head?

_________________
Dave

'06 CRD Limited, Lt. Khaki, MOPAR Slush Mats/Skids, DrawTite Front Hitch, Mag Lite, Yakima Bars, Thule Bike Rack, Fumoto, ORM, 245/70 Revo 2

Wish list: Lift, Boulder Bars, Something Bigger in the Front and Back, More Lights


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 12:26 pm 
Offline
Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Apr 18, 2007 6:25 pm
Posts: 1306
Location: Colorado USA
^^^ An OEM filter head should be a quality piece, and apparently it is not. So just replacing it is not going to fix the problem for good. And why should owner have to pay for a replacement if they haven't done any damage to it? This situation certainly warrants a recall, but it seems like that might not happen. I think a better option to replacing the same faulty part is to replace it with something better, like the OEM Racor or a Racor 245, retaining all the original functionality of heating, temp sensing, and water sensing.

_________________
'05 Liberty CRD B100, SEGR - SOLD

'01 Beetle TDi B100, EGR delete
'83 Mercedes 240D B100, no EGR

--- SEGR Builder ---


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 12:28 pm 
Offline
LOST Newbie

Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2007 3:26 pm
Posts: 56
Location: Chandler AZ
The only solution I see is installing a lift pump and cooler. Without it there is no way to acomplish solution #3. Removing the sulfur from diesel fuel may have lowwerd the vaporization point to where normal summer temperatures and our negative pressure system generate to much gas vapors. These gas vapors may not lubricate the Cp3 pump.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Improving the OEM Fuel Filter Head/system
PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 12:44 pm 
Offline
LOST Addict
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 9:31 pm
Posts: 1406
Location: Camano Island, Washington
BiodieselJeep.com wrote:
I think there is a vast majority of people who are keeping the OEM Fuel Filter head but are worried about air in the system causing stalls and power issues on load (perhaps the ORIGINAL reason for some tranny recalls). I personally see the OEM head as only one of many potential reasons for air leaks (my fuel heater unit certainly burned out)....but certainly not the only source of air. And other heads will STILL have the potential to collect air.

So, I propose a thread for mods to improve the functionality of the existing filter head. Some reasons for air that have been brought up:
1) Normal outgasing of vapors from fuel.
2) Excessive outgassing of vapors from heated fuel
3) Negative pressure system (no lift pump) pulling in air from unknown points on the line
4) Gasket issues with the OEM head
5) Fuel heater burn-out in the OEM head

Some proposed solutions:

1) Unplug the fuel heater plug (left one)
2) Install a lift pump (worthy of own thread)
3) T in some sort of "air catcher" on the exit hose from the filter
4) Fuel cooling
5) Gasket changes
6) Move the filter head lower? (my idea..not really practical)

I'd love peoplpe to chime in with the specifics on these solutions (gasket part numbers? Are there any "air catchers" out there?) Please add your thoughts.


My thoughts of the proposed solutions:

1) Unplugging the heater is not an fix for a bad connection. What the factory forgot to do is apply some good electrical contact grease to the termials and the problem is catching up to many 2005+ owners. I applied dielectric grease to the termials of the fuel heater once I learn this problem was happening. To learn why all one has to do is unplug the connector and look at how small the heater termials are. With the amount of amp draw, it's not wonder that it will burn up with just a little resistance at the connector. The heater turns off at 85 F so hot weather makes no differance if you leave it plugged in.

2) A lift pump will help greatly, If you check with manufactures that uses the CP3 pump with the lift pump, that pump will still work when the lift pump fails and the engine will run fine. But the CP3 pump life will be greatly reduced with an expensive repair later. DCX left our a@@es out to dry in this issue with the dirveablity and related problems cause by omiting the lift pump. I guess the warranty claim is lower than the cost of the lift pumps in the first place and the bean counter wins.

3) I have already done this with a check valve and it works somewhat. The CP3 can pull as much as 20 inch of vacuum on the filter head so that alone is not enough. I plan to install a lift pump that not only remove the vacuum, but also bleed the fuel system of air through the return at the same time. When I change a fuel filter on a 6.5L powerstoke, I only had to cycle the key on and off three times to bleed and emply filter. We can do the same with the right set up.

4) I know there is talk about cooling the fuel, but it's not a cure for the air in fuel problem. I think that this is alot more plumbing and expense that we will need. I drove my CRD in 105F weather with no ill effect. Since there is a concern about hot fuel, there should be more concern abput safety fuel shut off in case of accident instead of fuel cooling. I also think that fuel cooling will have major drawbacks in colder climants

5) I know a few here has been sucessful with changing the gasket on the heater puck. I don't recommend anyone do this unless necessary. I found the center threads to be a little loose on mine and it should be tighten first. If you have to replace the gasket, the head must be removed, the center nut removed and cleaned, the internal threads cleaned and put back together operating room clean. If not clean, one small piece of dirt can do major damage.


6) You already answer this question.

_________________
2006 Black Jeep Liberty CRD Limited
K&N, Samco Hoses, Michelin 245/70-16 LTX A/T2, Fumoto F-102, V-Force Muffler, Mopar, Hitch, Trailer Wiring, Skid Plates, Slush Mats, Rear Shelf, Predator Stage 1, Transgo, ORM & CodeReader, Facet 40109 Pump
"IT'S A DIESEL THING, YOU WOULDN'T UNDERSTAND"
Certified Services Auto & Truck Repair


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Improving the OEM Fuel Filter Head/system
PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 3:04 pm 
Offline
LOST Junkie

Joined: Sun Jun 11, 2006 10:02 am
Posts: 506
Location: Berlin, CT
BlackLibertyCRD wrote:
The heater turns off at 85 F so hot weather makes no differance if you leave it plugged in.


It does turn off? Can anyone confirm this? I was under the impressions that the stupid thing was always on.

ps I just got my CRD back today with a new filter head AND new heater plug. The element burn-out was so much that the plug also went bad. For now, I'm unplugging the heating plug.

_________________
2005 Liberty Sport CRD w/all the fixings
Elephant Hose, MAF (ORM), Amsoil Airfilter, nice when I get to drive it
1 EGRreplacement, but never again.
99.5 FrankenJetta TDI (R.I.P.): being turned into diesel hybrid!
99.5 Replacement Jetta TDI: deal of a lifetime, EHM, some other stuff


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Improving the OEM Fuel Filter Head/system
PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 5:09 pm 
Offline
LOST Addict
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 9:31 pm
Posts: 1406
Location: Camano Island, Washington
BiodieselJeep.com wrote:
BlackLibertyCRD wrote:
The heater turns off at 85 F so hot weather makes no differance if you leave it plugged in.


It does turn off? Can anyone confirm this? I was under the impressions that the stupid thing was always on.

ps I just got my CRD back today with a new filter head AND new heater plug. The element burn-out was so much that the plug also went bad. For now, I'm unplugging the heating plug.


There is still 12 volts at the plug but the heater element no longer heats above 85F. Otherwise we would have a heater that would boil the fuel. :shock: Depending on your location, it will not be a good idea to leave the heater unplug during winter. You could get fuel gelling and icing in the fuel filter which could mean a no start in the morning when you need it most. I have to run to Phila right now but will look it up in the manual when I get back.

EDIT:

Here it is cut and pasted from the manual.

OPERATION
The element inside the heater assembly is made of a Positive Temperature Coefficient (PTC) material, and has
power applied to it by the fuel heater relay anytime the ignition key is in the “on” position. PTC material has a high
resistance to current flow when its temperature is high, which means that it will not generate heat when the temperature
is above a certain value. When the temperature is below 7°C (45° F), the resistance of the PTC element
is lowered, and allows current to flow through the fuel heater element warming the fuel. When the temperature is
above 29°C (85° F), the PTC element’s resistance rises, and current flow through the heater element stops .
Voltage to operate the fuel heater is supplied from the glow plug module, through the fuel heater relay, when the
ECM senses the ignition (key) switch.

_________________
2006 Black Jeep Liberty CRD Limited
K&N, Samco Hoses, Michelin 245/70-16 LTX A/T2, Fumoto F-102, V-Force Muffler, Mopar, Hitch, Trailer Wiring, Skid Plates, Slush Mats, Rear Shelf, Predator Stage 1, Transgo, ORM & CodeReader, Facet 40109 Pump
"IT'S A DIESEL THING, YOU WOULDN'T UNDERSTAND"
Certified Services Auto & Truck Repair


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Improving the OEM Fuel Filter Head/system
PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 10:31 pm 
Offline
LOST Addict
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2007 11:33 pm
Posts: 1766
Location: Wisconsin Northwoods
BlackLibertyCRD Wrote [quote=2) A lift pump will help greatly, If you check with manufactures that uses the CP3 pump with the lift pump, that pump will still work when the lift pump fails and the engine will run fine. But the CP3 pump life will be greatly reduced with an expensive repair later. DCX left our a@@es out to dry in this issue with the dirveablity and related problems cause by omiting the lift pump. I guess the warranty claim is lower than the cost of the lift pumps in the first place and the bean counter wins.



4) I know there is talk about cooling the fuel, but it's not a cure for the air in fuel problem. I think that this is alot more plumbing and expense that we will need. I drove my CRD in 105F weather with no ill effect. Since there is a concern about hot fuel, there should be more concern abput safety fuel shut off in case of accident instead of fuel cooling. I also think that fuel cooling will have major drawbacks in colder climants

[/quote]


What makes you think that the CP3 will have a shorter life with a lift pump? The opposite should be true with decreased air going into the IP causing a situation with 0 lubrication, also it reduces the load on stock feed pump. I agree with the thought about the fuel cooler being more of a problem than a help. Winter isn't going to treat it nicely.

_________________
Manure green 2005 CRD sport4x4, GDE Hot tune, Cat Gut, OE skids, Draw tight hitch, Duramax lift pump, 160K on multiple varieties of fuel, XM radio, Escort live with Redline, fog light mod, GPS, Icom IC7000 all band radio call sign KC9QPF, Grabber AT2s on Soft 8s, FIA grill blanket.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Improving the OEM Fuel Filter Head/system
PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 11:15 pm 
Offline
LOST Addict
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 9:31 pm
Posts: 1406
Location: Camano Island, Washington
nursecosmo wrote:
BlackLibertyCRD Wrote [quote=2) A lift pump will help greatly, If you check with manufactures that uses the CP3 pump with the lift pump, that pump will still work when the lift pump fails and the engine will run fine. But the CP3 pump life will be greatly reduced with an expensive repair later. DCX left our a@@es out to dry in this issue with the dirveablity and related problems cause by omiting the lift pump. I guess the warranty claim is lower than the cost of the lift pumps in the first place and the bean counter wins.



4) I know there is talk about cooling the fuel, but it's not a cure for the air in fuel problem. I think that this is alot more plumbing and expense that we will need. I drove my CRD in 105F weather with no ill effect. Since there is a concern about hot fuel, there should be more concern abput safety fuel shut off in case of accident instead of fuel cooling. I also think that fuel cooling will have major drawbacks in colder climants




What makes you think that the CP3 will have a shorter life with a lift pump? The opposite should be true with decreased air going into the IP causing a situation with 0 lubrication, also it reduces the load on stock feed pump. I agree with the thought about the fuel cooler being more of a problem than a help. Winter isn't going to treat it nicely.[/quote]

Hmmm You either read it wrong or I wrote it wrong. I said that a lift pump will help greatly, but when I said that the CP3 pump life will be reduced greatly, I meant without the lift pump. :oops:

_________________
2006 Black Jeep Liberty CRD Limited
K&N, Samco Hoses, Michelin 245/70-16 LTX A/T2, Fumoto F-102, V-Force Muffler, Mopar, Hitch, Trailer Wiring, Skid Plates, Slush Mats, Rear Shelf, Predator Stage 1, Transgo, ORM & CodeReader, Facet 40109 Pump
"IT'S A DIESEL THING, YOU WOULDN'T UNDERSTAND"
Certified Services Auto & Truck Repair


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 17, 2007 2:56 am 
Offline
LOST Newbie

Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2007 3:29 am
Posts: 22
Location: Angola, west Africa
This might be a dumb question, but if the ambient temps never drop below 70F, should I just disconnect the heater and be done with it? Or is there something I am missing?

Thanks,
Cam


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 17, 2007 10:22 am 
Offline
LOST Addict

Joined: Fri Sep 16, 2005 2:01 am
Posts: 1944
Location: Mooresville, NC
threadfin wrote:
This might be a dumb question, but if the ambient temps never drop below 70F, should I just disconnect the heater and be done with it? Or is there something I am missing?

Thanks,
Cam


No, you're right on the money. If over in Africa you're never going to see below 70 F, no reason whatsoever you'd need a fuel heater. Leave the bloody thing unplugged and be done with it.

Matter of fact, when I was checking on Racor and Stanadyne fuel filters, I called up one of the largest distributors of diesel equipment for this area up in Greensboro NC. While we were discussing the options I'd want to get on a filter assembly, he stopped in the middle of our discussion and asked me a question -

"Why do you need a fuel heater in North Carolina? From our experience, as long as you're treating your fuel for winter, a fuel heater is next to useless." I imagine that question would carry even more weight for locations farther south.

I know of at least one owner that did clean the contacts and apply dielectric grease, did his best to ensure a good electrical connection, and often checked the wires and connection to make sure they weren't getting hot (a sign of a poor connection). He ended up with not one, but two melted fuel heaters - the heater in his replacement fuel filter assembly melting down as well. This leads me to believe there are other factors besides the electrical connection involved.

And from the description of some of the instances of fuel heater meltdowns, the PTC self-shutdown apparently did not work, whether due to a manufacturing defect or other reason.

Having had my spare stock fuel filter assembly apart a few times and looking over that hockey puck, I'm more and more of the opinion it's just a poor design. Besides the problematic electrical connection for the heater, the only openings for fuel flow are a single 3/8" diameter port above and below the fuel temp sensor, to where it looks as though the heater, off to the other side, is sitting in a "dead zone" with little fuel flow around it. This also looks to be ready-made for trapping a sizeable air pocket around the heater with little way of getting rid of it while running, other than hand-priming and venting when shut down, if running without a lift pump.

IMO, for those that need/want to keep the stock filter assembly, the best option is to rig up a fuel heater separate from the filter assembly. Stanadyne makes a side load fuel heater, a pencil type threaded to screw into the side ports on their filter assemblies, available in 1/4" and 3/8" NPT, 12V 100 watts, complete with it's own thermostat and wiring harness, for around $45. With the appropriate size brass pipe fittings and hose connectors for your local hardware store, you could construct it's own separate housing which could be plumbed into the fuel line ahead of the filter. You would need to remove the stock electrical connector from the fuel heater harness to wire it in, but could install quick disconnect connectors such that it could be removed and the stock connector reinstalled and the stock heater reconnected for trips to the dealer if desired.

That's about the only way I can see that you could completely eliminate any chance of HPMD (Hockey Puck Melt Down).

_________________
Mitchell Oates
'87 MB 300D Diamond Blue Metallic
'87 MB 300D - R.I.P. 12/08
'05 Sport CRD Stone White
Provent CCV Filter/AT2525 Muffler
Stanadyne 30 u/Cat 2 u Fuel Filters
Fumoto Drain/Fleetguard LF3487 Oil filter
V6 Airbox/Amsoil EAA Air Filter
Suncoast TC/Shift Kit/Aux Cooler
Kennedy Lift Pump/Return Fuel Cooler


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 17, 2007 5:43 pm 
Offline
LOST Newbie

Joined: Thu Jan 18, 2007 12:00 am
Posts: 19
my experiences to date.
before i changed my filter i never had any probs with air....
once the filter was changed it has become a constant chore to bleed before driving.
i had a leak at the heater plug connection and had a new filter head installed under warranty.(think heater burned and made the head leak)
i am now bleeding air out everyday with the new head daily(i have left the heater uplugged on this one)
im under the opinion that air has reached the suction pump as is stuck and only pulled fom ther suction pump as the fuel in the tank cools pulling air into head as its cooling. but i have been wrong before.
so what im going to try is leaving my tank cap off overnight when i get home and seeing if this makes a differrence.
i can prime my system and it holds firm for days without being driven adding to the theory that the fuel cooling overnight is pulling air from somewhwhere.
where you ask? maybe the suction pump maybe not..
why you ask? blocked or poor design fuel tank breather which as the fuel cools pulls air (only a thoery so go easy)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 17, 2007 11:06 pm 
Offline
LOST Newbie

Joined: Sun Jul 15, 2007 2:51 am
Posts: 46
Location: socal
I will be going with the lift pump and I am working with fass to develop a system for us.
For now I am going to get rid of the banjo fittings on the filter head as they are very restrictive.
I may go with racor with no heater or sensor and just hang the puck in the breeze

_________________
Hers 05 kj ehm, egr delete, unplugged fuel heater, exhaust improvements
His 02 2wd 5spd/ con ofe, gear vendors, 100hp injectors, switzer s300 turbo, shied street cam, arp studs, smarty, fass, high speed floormats...and so on
His 86 cucv 6.2 mostly stock


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Improving the OEM Fuel Filter Head/system
PostPosted: Sat Aug 18, 2007 1:31 am 
Offline
Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member
User avatar

Joined: Sat Apr 15, 2006 12:56 pm
Posts: 1831
Location: Spokane, WA
BlackLibertyCRD wrote:

There is still 12 volts at the plug but the heater element no longer heats above 85F. Otherwise we would have a heater that would boil the fuel. :shock: Depending on your location, it will not be a good idea to leave the heater unplug during winter. You could get fuel gelling and icing in the fuel filter which could mean a no start in the morning when you need it most. I have to run to Phila right now but will look it up in the manual when I get back.

EDIT:

Here it is cut and pasted from the manual.

OPERATION
The element inside the heater assembly is made of a Positive Temperature Coefficient (PTC) material, and has
power applied to it by the fuel heater relay anytime the ignition key is in the “on” position. PTC material has a high
resistance to current flow when its temperature is high, which means that it will not generate heat when the temperature
is above a certain value. When the temperature is below 7°C (45° F), the resistance of the PTC element
is lowered, and allows current to flow through the fuel heater element warming the fuel. When the temperature is
above 29°C (85° F), the PTC element’s resistance rises, and current flow through the heater element stops .
Voltage to operate the fuel heater is supplied from the glow plug module, through the fuel heater relay, when the
ECM senses the ignition (key) switch.


I wonder if the above is always true. Not everyone here has had a heater failure. Now that may be luck, it may be that some have had a good electrical connection so resistance has not created a problem despite the small contact area of the pins, or it may be that some of the heaters do not work and do not turn off thus melting down.

I also wonder if some become overzealous in their priming and are creating a problem in the filter head by applying pressure where virtually none should exist, creating head failure at the heater plug or the filter or puck seals?

_________________
Dave

'06 CRD Limited, Lt. Khaki, MOPAR Slush Mats/Skids, DrawTite Front Hitch, Mag Lite, Yakima Bars, Thule Bike Rack, Fumoto, ORM, 245/70 Revo 2

Wish list: Lift, Boulder Bars, Something Bigger in the Front and Back, More Lights


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Aug 18, 2007 6:31 am 
Offline
LOST Member

Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2007 5:46 am
Posts: 163
Location: Dexter Michigan
Daves statement may be very true - at least in my case:

"I also wonder if some become overzealous in their priming and are creating a problem in the filter head by applying pressure where virtually none should exist, creating head failure at the heater plug or the filter or puck seals?"

I don't think I had a filter head leak until I started messing aroung with my filter. I read all of the posts about making sure there was no air in the system and I think I overpressured the systems with the primer pump.

Only after I had primed did I notice oily/fuel on the wiring harness and then the dreaded hissing/spitting from the heater plug the next time I changed out the filter element.

Since replacing the system for a mere $150 bucks (including filter and water sensor) no leaks, no drips no errors.

_________________
2005 CRD Limited, Black 205k Miles (Timing Belt Changed at 100k and 200k), GDE Eco-Tune, Carter in-tank lift pump
2005 CRD Sport, Black - Ingested Valve at 170k miles R.I.P.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Aug 18, 2007 9:20 am 
Offline
LOST Addict

Joined: Fri Sep 16, 2005 2:01 am
Posts: 1944
Location: Mooresville, NC
Think about what you're saying - do you honestly think that even DC would be so stupid as to put in a filter so flimsy that just operating it's own hand priming pump would cause it to start leaking from the heater connection, with no other factors involved?

NHTSA would have recalled DC into bankruptcy long before they sold off Chrysler, not to mention the beast would never even have come close to being certified for sale in the U.S.

There are a number of design choices they made on the fuel system and filter assembly itself that are working in conjunction to cause the problems we're having, but this isn't one of them.

_________________
Mitchell Oates
'87 MB 300D Diamond Blue Metallic
'87 MB 300D - R.I.P. 12/08
'05 Sport CRD Stone White
Provent CCV Filter/AT2525 Muffler
Stanadyne 30 u/Cat 2 u Fuel Filters
Fumoto Drain/Fleetguard LF3487 Oil filter
V6 Airbox/Amsoil EAA Air Filter
Suncoast TC/Shift Kit/Aux Cooler
Kennedy Lift Pump/Return Fuel Cooler


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Could Biodiesel be the culprit?
PostPosted: Sat Aug 18, 2007 9:48 am 
Offline
LOST Junkie

Joined: Sun Jun 11, 2006 10:02 am
Posts: 506
Location: Berlin, CT
Let me pose a question that everyone might not like to hear:

Could it be biodiesel weakening some seals?

Some of these contractors are making pretty lame products and the "biodiesel-proofing" that was supposed to happen industry-wide in 1994 was definitely not complete. There are several examples of this. Could some of the filter seals be even slightly softened or warped by amounts of Biodiesel? Maybe the fuel heater has a vulnerability? Euro models would seem to have more exposure to Biodiesel but then again we don't know if they have the same filterhead or problems.

So, we need to hear from people with air-leaks who DIDN'T ever use Biodiesel (home-made or store-bought).

_________________
2005 Liberty Sport CRD w/all the fixings
Elephant Hose, MAF (ORM), Amsoil Airfilter, nice when I get to drive it
1 EGRreplacement, but never again.
99.5 FrankenJetta TDI (R.I.P.): being turned into diesel hybrid!
99.5 Replacement Jetta TDI: deal of a lifetime, EHM, some other stuff


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 106 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: APC9199, papaindigo, truckbouy2 and 38 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group. Color scheme by ColorizeIt!
Logo by pixeldecals.com